Graduation Date

Spring 2022

Document Type

Thesis

Program

Master of Science degree with a major in Kinesiology, option Exercise Science

Committee Chair Name

Dr. Young Kwon

Committee Chair Affiliation

HSU Faculty or Staff

Second Committee Member Name

Eden Donahue

Second Committee Member Affiliation

HSU Faculty or Staff

Third Committee Member Name

Dr. Whitney Ogle

Third Committee Member Affiliation

HSU Faculty or Staff

Subject Categories

Kinesiology

Abstract

Physical activity has been shown to positively affect both mental and physical health. A means of determining an individual’s physical fitness is a necessary tool in developing and maintaining a healthy exercise routine. The 1.5-mile run test provides an accurate and reliable estimate of VO2 max and can be used to routinely assess cardiorespiratory fitness. The aim of this study is to develop normative data for the 1.5 mile run test for both college-aged women and men. We examine how the calculated normative data presented produced by the Cooper Institute compares to our measured values, as well as compare sex differences within this study.

A total of 397 (197 female; 200 male) moderately active individuals partook in the study and completed the 1.5-mile test on a treadmill. Normative data was generated for completion time, average speed and absolute and relative VO2 max. There was not a significant difference between the Cooper Institute’s calculated normative values and the normative data developed in this study. There was a 13.9% difference in 1.5-mile completion time between men and women, with men running at an average speed 12.3% faster than women. This difference in run performance decreased when expressed relative to body mass and lean body mass suggesting that the higher performance in men was partly due to male subjects having more lean body mass and mass in general than female subjects.

Citation Style

APA

Included in

Public Health Commons

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Thesis/Project Location

 
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