Graduation Date

Fall 2019

Document Type

Thesis

Program

Master of Arts degree with a major in Psychology, option Academic Research

Committee Chair Name

William M. Reynolds

Committee Chair Affiliation

HSU Faculty or Staff

Second Committee Member Name

Carrie J. Aigner

Second Committee Member Affiliation

HSU Faculty or Staff

Third Committee Member Name

Frank DeMatteo

Third Committee Member Affiliation

HSU Faculty or Staff

Subject Categories

Psychology

Abstract

During early adolescence, schools play a significant role in the development of students. An issue that continues to be a serious concern for students, parents, teachers, and school officials in the U.S. and around the world is bullying. The primary purpose of this study was to examine school connectedness as a mediator between bully-victimization and depressive symptomatology in early adolescence. The secondary purpose of the study was to explore how gender and bullying classification groups (i.e., bully, victim, bully-victim, and non-involved) may relate to levels of reported school connectedness. The current study found low school connectedness partially mediated the relationship between bully victimization and depressive symptoms. Results also showed non-involved youth reported higher levels of school connectedness compared to bullies, victims, and bully-victim. The present study sought to expand literature of bullying, depression, and school connectedness in early adolescence with the aim of informing prevention, intervention and policy initiatives.

Citation Style

APA

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