Graduation Date

Fall 2017

Document Type

Thesis

Program

Master of Science degree with a major in Kinesiology, option Exercise Science

Committee Chair Name

Dr. Young Sub Kwon

Committee Chair Affiliation

HSU Faculty or Staff

Second Committee Member Name

Dr. Boe Burrus

Second Committee Member Affiliation

HSU Faculty or Staff

Third Committee Member Name

Dr. Taylor Bloedon

Third Committee Member Affiliation

HSU Faculty or Staff

Subject Categories

Kinesiology

Abstract

Anaerobic capacity has implications in health and sport. Sprint interval training improves anaerobic capacity, aerobic factors, as well as performance. Optimal durations for taxing anaerobic capacity have been shown to be 60 seconds, and have been elicited using the Anaerobic Speed Test. In order to maintain this optimal duration for multiple sets, a decreasing workloads method must be used as fatigue increases following each set. These work-loading methods must be compared to determine which protocol allows for the maximum exercise volume to be achieved. The purpose of this study was to compare the effects of three different workload protocols on exercise volume completed during multiple sets of exhaustive anaerobic running on a treadmill. Twelve recreationally active male subjects completed a preliminary session (VO2max test) followed by three sessions of high intensity running on a graded treadmill with three different protocols using parameters adopted from the AST (20% grade, 8 mph to exhaustion). Four sets were completed during each protocol. Protocols included: 1) constant sets (CS): no descending work load in all four sets, 2) descending speed (DS): the speed is decreased by 10% for each subsequent set, 3) descending grade (DG): the grade is decreased by 10% for each subsequent set. Time to exhaustion, work, Stride frequency, heart rate, and RPE were measure for every set. Total work achieved during the four sets of the DS protocol was significantly higher than both the CS (p<0.01) and DG (p<0.01) protocols. Time to exhaustion achieved during the 2nd, 3rd and 4th sets of the DS protocol were significantly higher than the 2nd, 3rd and 4th sets of the CS protocol, all under p<0.01. Stride frequency during the 3rd set of the DS protocol was significantly lower than the 3rd set of the CS protocol (p<0.01). Additionally, stride frequency during the 4th set of the DS protocol was significantly higher than the 4th sets of the CS and DG protocols (p<0.01). The longer times per set and greater work achieved during the DS protocol, in comparison to the DG and CS protocols, suggests the potential for a greater training effect. Differences in stride frequency values among the protocols could help explain differences in performance implicating muscle fiber type recruitment and fatigue.

Citation Style

APA

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