Graduation Date

Fall 2019

Document Type

Thesis

Program

Master of Science degree with a major in Environmental Systems, option Geology

Committee Chair Name

Dr. A. Mark Hemphill-Haley

Committee Chair Affiliation

HSU Faculty or Staff

Second Committee Member Name

Dr. Raymond Burke

Second Committee Member Affiliation

HSU Faculty or Staff

Third Committee Member Name

Dr. Brandon E. Schabb

Third Committee Member Affiliation

Community Member or Outside Professional

Fourth Committee Member Name

Joseph Seney

Fourth Committee Member Affiliation

HSU Faculty or Staff

Subject Categories

Geology

Abstract

Throughout the world, long range transport (LRT) of aeolian dust plays a major role in the total global dust budget. Research suggests that LRT dust from the deserts of North Africa play a role in soil genesis in the Americas. The focus of this study is a preliminary investigation for evidence of North African dust or volcanic ash influence on the soils in the Cockscomb Basin Wildlife Sanctuary in Stann Creek District, Belize. A series of 7 soil profiles were analyzed from a catena transect to determine if there is evidence of foreign materials by using X-ray diffraction and Scanning Electron Microscope analyses in order to identify mineralogy and micro-abrasions that would indicate parent material origin from a possible influence of LRT dust. This yielded the finding that there is little convincing evidence for LRT dust deposition in the soils examined.

Citation Style

Harvard

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