Graduation Date

Spring 2019

Document Type

Thesis

Program

Master of Science degree with a major in Kinesiology, option Exercise Science

Committee Chair Name

Dr. Young Sub Kwon

Committee Chair Affiliation

HSU Faculty or Staff

Second Committee Member Name

Dr. Whitney Ogle

Second Committee Member Affiliation

HSU Faculty or Staff

Third Committee Member Name

Andrew Petersen

Third Committee Member Affiliation

HSU Faculty or Staff

Fourth Committee Member Name

Benjamin Servais

Fourth Committee Member Affiliation

HSU Faculty or Staff

Abstract

PURPOSE: To assess how accurately Division II NCAA football players can predict repetitions-to-failure (RTF) during the bench press exercise using an absolute load of 225-lbs by comparing predicted repetitions-to-failure with actual repetitions-to-failure. METHODS: Twenty football players (age 20 ± 2 years; height 1.85 ± .06 m; weight 110.1 ± 19.3 kg) without muscular or skeletal injuries were tested for their 1repetition maximum (1-RM) in the bench press, and then performed 1 set to concentric failure with 225-lbs. Subjects predicted how many repetitions they could perform after the warm-up and again after the fourth, eighth, twelfth repetitions. A general regression analysis was used to determine the relationship between predicted repetitions-to-failure and actual repetitions-to-failure after the warm-up and after the 4th, 8th, and 12th repetitions. Additionally, the relationship between predicted- and actual-repetitions-to-failure and 1-RM after the warm-up and after the 4th, 8th, and 12th repetitions was determined using a general regression analysis. RESULTS: The general regression equation indicated significant positive relationships between predicted- and actual repetitions-to-failure after the warm-up & after the 8th and 12th repetitions (p < .05). A significant relationship was not found between predicted- and-actual-repetitions-to-failure after the 4th repetition (p < .05). Significant positive relationships were found between actual and predicted repetitions-to-failure after the warm-up and 1-RM and after the 4th repetitions (p < .05); however significant relationships between actual- and predicted repetitions-to-failure were not found after the 8th & 12th repetitions (p < .05). DISCUSSION: Subjects were more accurate in predicting repetitions-to-failure in the latter half of the set. This may be due to fatigue influencing their physiological and physical protective mechanisms or a learned effect from experience in weightlifting. CONCLUSION: It may be possible for Division II NCAA football players to regulate volume during the 225-lb bench press test; however it is not supported by the current investigation to use the RTF scores to predict 1-RM.

Citation Style

APA

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