Graduation Date

Fall 2017

Document Type

Thesis

Program

Master of Science degree with a major in Biology

Committee Chair Name

Michael Camann

Committee Chair Affiliation

HSU Faculty or Staff

Second Committee Member Name

Alison O'Dowd

Second Committee Member Affiliation

HSU Faculty or Staff

Third Committee Member Name

Peggy Wilzbach

Third Committee Member Affiliation

HSU Faculty or Staff

Fourth Committee Member Name

Kristine Brenneman

Fourth Committee Member Affiliation

HSU Faculty or Staff

Subject Categories

Biology

Abstract

Intermittent streams are common throughout the world and comprise 60% or more of total river lengths in the conterminous United States. Despite their prevalence, intermittent streams are understudied, particularly first-order headwater streams, which are vital for maintaining the function, health and biotic diversity of river networks. In June 2016, I sampled five intermittent and five perennial headwater streams in the Mattole River watershed in northwestern coastal California, USA, to compare benthic macroinvertebrate (BMI) assemblages between intermittent and perennial streams. BMI samples were collected using a 500µm mesh D-net at eight randomly located riffles along a 150-m reach, and then composited, on each of the 10 streams. Chemical (e.g. pH, dissolved oxygen, temperature, and flow) and physical (e.g. bed substrate composition, bank-full width, and slope) data were measured at each stream reach. BMI samples were identified using Standard Taxonomic Effort (STE). Major difference in assemblages among stream type were not detected except for a few individual taxa, families, and orders. Observed differences likely resulting from taxonomic differences in life history timing. The proportion of shredders was detectably lower in intermittent streams. Further studies with a temporal factor are needed to validate these findings.

Citation Style

APA

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Thesis/Project Location

 
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