Graduation Date

Spring 2017

Document Type

Dissertation/Thesis

Program

Master of Science degree with a major in Natural Resources, option Forestry, Watershed, & Wildland Sciences

First Committee Member Name

Dr. David Greene

First Committee Member Email

david.greene@humboldt.edu

First Committee Member Affililation

HSU Faculty or Staff

Second Committee Member Name

Dr. Aaron Hohl

Second Committee Member Email

aaron.hohl@humboldt.edu

Second Committee Member Affililation

HSU Faculty or Staff

Third Committee Member Name

Dr. Mark Rizzardi

Third Committee Member Email

mark.rizzardi@humboldt.edu

Third Committee Member Affililation

HSU Faculty or Staff

Subject Categories

Forestry

Abstract

This thesis analyzes the growth of red fir (Abies magnifica) and California white fir (Abies concolor var. lowiana) in three different sites in California and creates an individual-tree, distance-independent growth simulator. The first chapter of this thesis is a literature review discussing the issues facing the forests composed of these montane true fir in California and the forest growth simulators in common use. The second chapter uses AICc model comparison to determine which models for each species best predicts growth of individual trees in terms of basal area increment (BAI). The third chapter of this thesis uses these individual-tree growth models to create a simulator from an Excel workbook to predict how long treatments would persist in uneven-aged, red and white fir composed stands. Twelve hypothetical stands were created and treated in order to illustrate treatment persistence. Sequoia National Forest (SNF) had shorter treatment persistences than similar Klamath National Forest and Tahoe National Forest (TNF) scenarios. Red fir dominated stands had shorter treatment persistences than similar white fir dominated scenarios. More moist stands had shorter treatment persistences than drier stands.

Citation Style

APA

Accessibility Checker

1

Share

 
COinS