Graduation Date

Spring 2017

Document Type

Dissertation/Thesis

Program

Master of Arts degree with a major in Psychology, option Academic Research

Committee Chair Name

Ethan Gahtan

Committee Chair Email

eg51@humboldt.edu

Committee Chair Affiliation

HSU Faculty or Staff

Second Committee Member Name

Christopher Aberson

Second Committee Member Email

christopher.aberson@humboldt.edu

Second Committee Member Affiliation

HSU Faculty or Staff

Third Committee Member Name

David Baston

Third Committee Member Email

David.Baston@humboldt.edu

Third Committee Member Affiliation

HSU Faculty or Staff

Subject Categories

Psychology

Abstract

Caffeine has diverse effects on neurons including, potentially, protection against Parkinson’s-related neurodegeneration. Caffeine may protect neurons from damage by limiting mitochondrial membrane permeability through a calcium-dependent mechanism. This study was a first step investigating calcium’s role in caffeine neuroprotection in vivo using zebrafish larvae. Elavl3:GCaMP6s zebrafish, which express a genetically encoded fluorescent calcium indicator protein in most CNS neurons, received caffeine (0, 50, 125, 250 µM, bath applied) in an ascending dose series during fluorescence calcium imaging of a central catecholaminergic nucleus (a proposed zebrafish homolog of the locus coeruleus, a structure affected in Parkinson’s disease). Parallel experiments tested effects of an ascending dose series of paraxanthine (0, 40, 100, 200 µM), a neuroactive caffeine metabolite, to assess whether paraxanthine mediates caffeine effects. Five outcomes were measured: spontaneous calcium oscillations, visually-evoked calcium responses, spontaneous swimming activity, visually-evoked swimming, and heart rate (visual responses were evoked by a sudden dimming of ambient illumination). Caffeine and paraxanthine had no effect on the power of low frequency (

Citation Style

APA

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Thesis/Project Location

 
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